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Want to Drive New Clients To Your Website? Start Blogging (One Minute Masterclass)

"It's not  who  you know, and it's not  what  you know...it's  who knows what  you know." --me, c. 2002, while trying to come up with "a thing your dad always says" for his daughter's 5th grade class

"It's not who you know, and it's not what you know...it's who knows what you know."
--me, c. 2002, while trying to come up with "a thing your dad always says" for his daughter's 5th grade class

When you post something to Facebook, Instagram, Twitter or Pinterest, you are, essentially, blogging, i.e. you're adding content to the web to engage an audience, building your brand and ideally direct them back to your website to learn more. But there's a huge difference between creating your content directly on Facebook, and creating it on your website then sharing it out. When you blog on your site first and share it out to other platforms, you own your content and reap the fruits of your labor, instead of giving a large part of your effort away to Mark Zuckerberg

Why add new content to your website that’s already done? Because new content = change, and search engines rely on evidence of change to justify revisiting your site and reevaluating your relevance. Change is the bait you use to lure them back. Evidence of growing relevance--regular posts containing relevant words, more visitors clicking through to your post from social media--is how search engines determine whether your site appears on page one or page fifty-one. The more you force their hand to re-visit your site, the more opportunities you give yourself to improve your site's ranking.

What to blog about? Well, the dirty little secret is that unless you're already famous, your main audience for the first few years will be automated web crawlers, so don't worry about quality; focus on quantity. Blog about anything you enjoy, so long as you post regularly, and so long as your posts contain relevant keywords and phrases ("architect," "home renovation," "theater design," etc) that reinforce some aspect of your brand (e.g. you-as-competent-architect, you-as-community-volunteer) The quality of your writing doesn't matter as much as using words, phrases and thoughts your future clients may be searching for.

Things like, how much you enjoyed that Paul Rudolph exhibit the other day at the Center for Architecture, or how you saved a client money, will work nicely. So long as what you post is authentic and relevant to your professional expertise it will catch Google's attention, trigger the algorithms that evaluate relevance, and expose your site to more Google searches.

Of course, none of this would be possible without the phenomena of “social sharing” and the inbound links sharing generates, but that will be our topic in the next LinkedIn chapter: Social Sharing for Architects and Designers

Conclusion: if you want to increase the chances of being found on the web, start blogging on your own website, write from the heart, do it on a regular basis, make it relevant to you, and always post to your website, not Mark Zuckerberg's

Good luck, and please share this article.

*exceptions to this rule include famous people who, because of huge Twitter followings, get all the attention they need from their tweets (aka 144 character blogs) and concede no value to Twitter as a platform